Nottinghamshire Insight

Joint strategic needs assessment

Children and Young People’s Oral Health (2014)

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Topic title Children and Young People’s Oral Health (2014)
Topic owner Children's Trust
Topic author(s) Tina Bhundia & Anne Pridgeon
Topic quality reviewed March 2014
Topic endorsed by Children's Trust
Topic approved by Children's Trust
Current version 15.12.2014 (minor editing)
Replaces version 5.8.2014 (updated data)

Executive summary

Chapter summary

Oral health is essential to general health and quality of life. The World Health Organisation (2013) defines oral health as a state of being free from mouth and facial pain, oral and throat cancer, oral infection and sores, periodontal (gum) disease, tooth decay, tooth loss, and other diseases and disorders that limit an individual’s capacity in biting, chewing, smiling, speaking, and psychosocial wellbeing.

http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs318/en/

As well as pain or infection, poor oral health is associated with low weight and failure to thrive in infancy. Poor dental hygiene may continue into adulthood when periodontal disease is associated with heart disease, improved oral health is capable of reversing this effect.  Poor oral health during pregnancy is associated with premature birth. Evidence also clearly suggests that poor hygiene habits, along with high levels of deprivation, and cultural background all play a part in effecting the quality of a child’s oral health with millions of pounds spent annually on dental treatment in the UK.

Surveys of the teeth of children in Nottingham City and Nottinghamshire County & Bassetlaw, demonstrate a wide variation in the level of oral health. The NHS Dental Epidemiology Programme for England co-ordinates surveys of the dental health of school children across all local authority areas. In 2007/08, 5-year-old children in Nottinghamshire & Bassetlaw were estimated to have an average of 0.81 decayed missing or filled teeth (dmft) compared with a national average of 1.11. When a breakdown of districts was looked at, results showed a clear difference between areas of higher social deprivation, lower social deprivation and water fluoridated areas. Dmft levels were better in areas of lower social deprivation and where water supplies are fluoridated.  An update of the national survey is underway.

Key contacts

None provided.

This is an online synopsis of the topic which shows the executive summary and key contacts sections. To view the full document, please download it.

Full report »